Free Comic Book Day (FCBD) is the event to strengthen your interest in the amazing world of comic books, trade paperbacks, graphic novels, trading cards, superhero figurines, and posters of your favorite characters. FCBD also serves as the perfect opportunity for those curious about comic books to stop by their local store, pick up some free comics, and see the wonderful artwork and entertaining storytelling showcased within. As perfectly described on freecomicbookday.com (as part of the Diamond Pop-Culture Network) as to what the event is, “Free Comic Book Day is an annual event founded on the belief that for every person out there, there’s a comic book that they’ll love.”

Quality Time with Family Ties is a weekly podcast in which three guys watch and review Family Ties - the '80s sitcom that made Michael J. Fox a star.

"Higher Love." Today on QTWFT, we learn . . . When my professor swears that he is made of truth, I do believe him - though I know he lies.

Comic book publisher BOOM! Studios will soon be releasing Over the Garden Wall #13 on Wednesday, May 10, written by George Mager, illustrated by Kiernan Sjursen-Lien, and with cover art by Sjursen-Lien and Jeremy Sorese. The publisher has been very generous to the Fanbase Press staff, as we are now able to share an exclusive advance preview of Issue #13!

A fandom has reached the pinnacle of popular culture greatness when a day is celebrated in its honor; however, it is an unprecedented phenomenon when a franchise has two days each year to celebrate its geekiness. While some enduring franchises of multiple decades do not have any globally recognized commemorative days, Star Wars is the singular franchise that has back-to-back celebratory days: May the Fourth and Revenge of the Fifth.

Dark and domineering, Darth Vader is one of the most iconic villains of all time. He commands the screen—whether by just a glimpse of his helmet, a brief breath of air, or the glow of a red lightsaber. Below are 10 reasons why Vader was, is, and always will be a perfect villain.

I’m dating myself here, but I am old enough to have seen Star Wars during its original theatrical run in 1977.  It’s interesting to think about how the movie-going experience has changed over 40 years.  I grew up in a small town in the Midwest.  Kansas City was my nearest major metropolitan area.  It took a while before I got a chance to see Star Wars for a couple of reasons. First, I was in elementary school and unable to drive myself. The second was that, for quite a long time, Star Wars screened exclusively on one screen in Kansas City, and Kansas City wasn’t alone as it relates to that release pattern.  Star Wars played at the Glenwood Cinema for over one full year (55 weeks to be exact).  With it only playing on one screen in a city of nearly two million people, getting into it was kind of like getting tickets to Hamilton.  Contemporary release patterns are considerably more wide and extensive.  Films move in and out of the multiplex quickly, because the studios need to maximize that opening weekend as much as they can.  If a film doesn’t open well, it doesn’t have time to find an audience, because there are more movies coming after it that will eat up the screens.  For instance, The Force Awakens opened on over 4100 screens across North American.  To put in perspective the change from 1977, when Star Wars ran in first run cinemas for over 12 months, a year after The Force Awakens was released, Rogue One was already in theaters and The Last Jedi was already in principle photography.

Tread Perilously is a podcast in which hosts Erik Amaya and author Justin Robinson watch the “worst” episodes of popular TV shows, attempting to determine if they would continue to watch the series based on the most off-key moments.

This Week: The Prisoner's "Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darling"

Tread Perilously makes a visit to London -- and Austria -- for the worst episode of the beloved cult classic, The Prisoner: "Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darling."

Mass Effect: Andromeda has sought to recapture the novelty and possibility of the original Mass Effect by taking the franchise to a totally new galaxy. The design elements, the characters, the player input, and the visual cuing all try to build the sense of discovery.

Hello, my dear readers. Forgive my sporadic schedule lately. I promise to pull it together for the upcoming release of the Wonder Woman film! It's getting closer and closer as I try to worm my way into the premiere! Where's my invisible pole vault when I need it? I think I cashed in all my connections. (Hint. Hint.)

Page 6 of 525
Go to top