Britannia: Lost Eagles of Rome is the third story arc which features the return of Rome’s first detective (referred to as “detector” in the story) Antonius Axia, an ex-military soldier who serves Emperor Nero.  The Valiant title has been described as “a combination of Batman meets Constantine set in the world of the Roman empire,” according to Bounding Into Comics’ John F. Trent (See “Valiant Comics Announces Britannia: Lost Eagles to Rome!” dated April 6, 2018.) but could also be termed a historical mystery.

What was fascinating about Bitter Root #1 was its ability to begin a story and weave together the stylistic feel of a Steampunk Harlem Renaissance with the issues of the present day. Bitter Root #2 continues that trend, picking up where we left off with Cullen and Berg battling a powerful, new Jinoo and protecting some civilians while a mysterious stranger mows down a KKK regiment who all turned to Jinoo themselves.

Comics, like any other media, suffer from an overdose of remakes, spinoffs, and sequels. If it isn't the juggernauts of Marvel and DC, then it's movie tie-ins, or TV tie-ins, and so on and so forth. That's why I sometimes go out of my way to pick up a comic purely because it doesn't appear to be related to any larger project. That's what motivated my decision to pick up Hex Vet: Witches in Training.

Tread Perilously is a podcast in which hosts Erik Amaya and author Justin Robinson watch the “worst” episodes of popular TV shows, attempting to determine if they would continue to watch the series based on the most off-key moments.

This Week: Brady Bunch's "A Very Brady Christmas"

Tread Merrily continues with Justin's first-ever look at the Brady Bunch in A Very Brady Christmas.

The following is an interview with Matt and Brittany Loisel on the comic book series, Murder. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with the Loisels about the inspiration behind the series, their shared creative process, what readers can anticipate from the story, and more!

The following is an interview with Dirk Wood, editor of Full Bleed magazine from IDW Publishing. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Wood about the launch of the Kickstarter campaign for Full Bleed: Volume 3 - Heavy Rotation, what readers can anticipate from the latest release, the cool backer rewards in store, and more!

When I finished reading and reviewing Shards: Volume 1, I was eagerly ready for more content from the creators of In Hiatus Studios. Getting my hands on a digital copy of the second anthology was as exciting as my first read of Volume 1, and the wait was well worth it.

“We typically don’t know what we have until it’s lost” is a lesson that many of us heard growing up, and it’s one that Jack Boniface has to contend with in this issue of Shadowman. For years, he’s wanted to be rid of the Ioa, and in Issue #10, he is finally free from his curse, but everything always has a consequence of some sort.

Who is Wonder Girl?  Wonder Girl originally made her first appearance in comics as a younger version of Wonder Woman (Princess Diana). It wasn’t until she appeared as a member of the Teen Titans that she was given her Donna Troy alter ego.  After a few attempts, the Titans didn’t really gain popularity until they were rebooted in the '80s by writer Marv Wolfman and artist George Perez.  A mix of old and new characters, the creators gave fans something a little different this time around. One of the previously established members of the team was Wonder Girl (a.k.a. Donna Troy), Wonder Woman’s adopted younger sister and sidekick. Under the tutelage of Wolfman and Perez, she would become one of the most popular members of the team.

I’m embarrassed to admit it, but I’ve never read Michael Moorcock’s books.  I’ve read almost every other fantasy writer, but, for some reason, I never got around to him. As I bow my head in shame, I can say that I finally know what has fascinated readers about the sword, Stormbringer, and the White Wolf (a.k.a. Elric of Melniboné).  Like all heroes (or anti-heroes), they carry a burden far greater than any of us could bear.

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