In The Fanbase Weekly, the Fanbase Press staff and a host of special guests from across the pop culture spectrum discuss the top geek stories of the week.

In this episode, the Fanbase Press staff welcomes guests Jared Sams (Spaceman Dead) and Turner Lange (The Adventures of Wally Fresh) to discuss the latest geek news stories of the week, including Colin Trevorrow's departure from Star Wars: Episode IX, the impact of Batman: The Animated Series on superhero media, Cassini's final mission, and Drew Goddard's attachment to the X-Force film.

The Kingdom is an area of land that is both self-sufficient and self-governing. It’s run by two brothers, Bruce and Robert, who are at odds with Sheriff Humbert on the outside in Cargill. People in the Kingdom live in relative peace, but when threatened, they aren’t about to let it go without a fight. After a wily and chaotic first six issues that dove almost immediately into an all-out battle between the Kingdom and Humbert’s men, the book has taken a sharp left turn into what was merely a subplot in the first six issues, but it was the story I was waiting for.

I wrote in my review about issue #24 of Cullen Bunn and Tyler Crook’s Harrow County that it felt like a punch had been pulled just as it was about to land. The conflict between two friends, Emmy and Bernice, suddenly enemies, like a ticking bomb, was seconds away from exploding. At the last second, someone unexpected - though logical enough - slipped in and cut the blue wire. In spite of this, we were left with a cliffhanger: a foreboding one. In issue #25, that punch that was pulled has become a knife sinking into a gut. That explosion has been redirected elsewhere. To say it’s effective would be an understatement.

Issue #7 opens with a beautifully eerie, noir moment of headlights gradually approaching through the darkness. The brightness pops out of the dark surroundings but still distorts our ability to see anything clearly. Neil Gaiman is a narrative master of distorting fantasy and reality (The main character’s name is Shadow, after all.), and Scott Hampton’s illustrations perfectly capture that technique. In this series, we never really know whether we can trust what we see, especially with the frequent re-occurrence of magical illusions, ghosts, and gods.

Here at Fanbase Press, we strive to provide an outlet for up-and-coming creators to promote and showcase their incredible works. With thousands of creators utilizing crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to make those works a reality, we will highlight these talented creators and their noteworthy campaigns through #CrowfundingFridays! We hope that you will join us in giving these projects a moment of your time (and possibly your support)!

The Mouse Guard Alphabet Book is exactly what it sounds like: an alphabet book grounded firmly in the fantasy world of David Petersen’s Mouse Guard cannon. For those who are entirely unfamiliar with the world of Mouse Guard, it is a fantasy space that centers on the trials and challenges of a mouse civilization whose collective survival depends on their adopting a united front in opposition to mouse-predators, such as ferrets, owls, and foxes. Mouse Guard, like many fantasy texts, has a bit of a medieval-inspired feel, and generally reminds this reader of Brian Jacques’ Redwall series.

Indie comics have always been a haven for the oddball, bizarre, and subversively humorous. Scapula and the Sinister Monster Doom Legion (created, written, and illustrated by Aidan Casserly) definitely checks off each one of those categories, and its lead character, while definitely earning his title of “the world’s worst villain,” has his own unique version of scummy, dirtbag charm that will certainly connect with specific readers who love crass, underdog baddies with lots of ambition.

In an exciting announcement for the comic book industry this morning, Tencent Animation & Comics’ library of wildly popular franchises from Asia will be coming to North America and other English-speaking countries. In an exclusive partnership with Tapas Media, the titles will begin to roll out today on the Tapas App, an independent book and digital comic platform, that is available for iOS (iPhone and iPad) and Android devices. 

I want to be able to tell you that you should just read this series. Trying to describe what makes it so fantastic frequently feels like revealing too many of its secrets. But, I suppose, this wouldn’t be much of a review if I didn’t talk about it a little.

It’s quite often I think about my kids’ future. Do they want to play soccer or start ballet? What kind of music or movies will they love? Will they continue to love learning, as much as they seem to now? And occasionally, I wonder, what should I do if they struggle with anything in school?

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