Tread Perilously is a podcast in which hosts Erik Amaya and author Justin Robinson watch the “worst” episodes of popular TV shows, attempting to determine if they would continue to watch the series based on the most off-key moments.

This Week: 7th Heaven's "Gratitude"

Tread Perilously's "Too Many Kids!" month concludes with the traditional Thanksgiving slice of 7th Heaven.

“Fundamental Comics,” a monthly editorial series that introduces readers to comics, graphic novels, and manga that have been impactful to the sequential art medium and the comic book industry on a foundational level.  Each month, a new essay will examine a familiar or less-known title through an in-depth analysis, exploring the history of the title, significant themes, and context for the title’s popularity since it was first released.

Weird Tales is a legendary magazine whose roots go back to the 1920s and served as the proving grounds of many influential horror and weird authors such as H. P. Lovecraft, Robert Bloch, Clark Ashton Smith, and Frank Belknap Long. The periodical has exchanged hands and creative editors over the last 100 years, with many long spells of inactivity peppered throughout. The newest issue of Weird Tales, number 363, is the first issue in five years and sees prolific speculative fiction author Jonathan Maberry at the editorial director’s helm.

Margaux Motin breaks a lot of standards for an artist working in a sequential artist medium. In many ways, it makes her the perfect artist to tell her story, because the art style in every way magnifies this unique memoir. Living in and originating from Paris, France, Motin began by earning a degree in visual arts and proceeded to do a BTS in visual communications at the National School of Applied Arts and Crafts. Her initial work was as a press illustrator for Muteen Magazine in a monthly column. Following this time of illustrating for press, publishing, and advertising, she started her own blog which served to share anecdotes during her thirties.

The following is an interview with Quinton Peeples (Runaways, Iron Fist, Flashforward, The Last Ship, Unforgettable) regarding the release of his graphic novel, The Big Country, from publisher Humanoids. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Peeples about the inspiration behind the graphic novel, his creative process in working with artist Dennis Calero to bring the story to life, his unique approach to melding the Western and noir genres, and more!

With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful. As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

My fandom for all things Witcher began in 2009 with game developer CD Projekt RED’s announcement that they were developing a new game, The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings, based on stories written by a Polish economist, Andrzej Sapkowski.  I was immediately fascinated by this new character, Geralt of Rivia, who was appealing as a protagonist due to his highly ethical stance towards others despite his detached nature.  Geralt was unique; he went through a painful bodily transformation.  Though still a man, his senses were mutated and heightened making him a perfect paid hunter of monsters that populated his world.  As a sword-for-hire, he was often feared and hated.  Hence, a complex character was introduced to American audiences through CD Projekt RED’s video games and Dark Horse Comics’ Witcher series of stories.

Like a lot of people, I was first introduced to Umbrella Academy via the Netflix show earlier this year. As such, my interest in the comic consists largely of the question, “How does it compare to the show?” The simple answer is, it’s very different, but it’s very entertaining in its own way.

The Arkham Sessions, hosted by Dr. Andrea Letamendi and Brian Ward, is a weekly podcast dedicated to the psychological analysis of Batman: The Animated Series. Nostalgic, humorous, and even a little educational, each episode promises to lend some insight into the heroes, villains, and classic stories of the Dark Knight!

The Arkham Sessions, Ep. 137 - "Doom Patrol - Donkey Patrol"

With every issue of this series, David Rubin must get the script and think to himself, “Time to go crazy,” because that’s what he does with the art of Ether. Some issues more so than others, and this is one of them - from the layout, to the creatures we’re introduced to, to the wonderful, weird world we find ourselves in along with Boone Dias. I'm curious if Matt Kindt repeatedly places two words throughout his script: go crazy.

Page 10 of 725
Go to top