The Evil Within fans are having a great year. First, it was announced that we’ll finally see a second title in the ever-popular video game series. Then, they received an intermediary gift in the form of a two-issue comic book series to bridge the gap between games #1 and #2. As a follow-up to the first issue, The Evil Within: The Interlude #2 (Titan Comics) satisfies the fan in every possible way and prepares them for their return to STEM.

In The Fanbase Weekly, the Fanbase Press staff and a host of special guests from across the pop culture spectrum discuss the top geek stories of the week.

In this episode, the Fanbase Press staff welcomes guest Michael Kogge (Star Wars: The Force Awakens - Junior Novelization, Empire of the Wolf) to discuss the latest geek news stories of the week, including DC deviating from the cinematic shared universe, the US government sending manned missions to the Moon, the new From a Certain Perspective anthology of Star Wars short stories, and the Batman: White Knight comic that takes on police brutality.

Save the date!  You won't want to miss the quince party of the year!  You're invited to the Quince release party and signing on Saturday, November 4, 2017, from 5:00-8:00 p.m. at Hi De Ho Comics in Santa Monica, CA!  Hosted by Hi De Ho Comics and the Comadres y Comics podcast, the event will not only celebrate the release of the Quince trade paperback from publisher Fanbase Press but will also be a quince party in its own right, complete with a Quinceañera-themed photo booth, a Quinceañera candy table, Latinx-themed food, a DJ, and much, much more!

American Gods: Shadows #8 continues to encourage us to think about American land and the land’s relationship with people. By providing some history of settlement in America, the series asks how our history contributes to how we identify as American today. And then, of course, there’s the mythos factor that shapes the American identity, as well.

Dealing with the death of Lloegyr national, Endre/Brother Dominic opened Penny White’s small parish life to something greater than imagination: an entire fantastical world populated by beings considered mythological by residents of the human world; however, the intoxicating lure of the magical creates a divide between her mundane life as a small-town vicar and the comparative excitement of her new position as a religious liaison between the two worlds.  Can Penny figure out what is most important to her: the constant excitement of something new or the ties with those around her? Will she make it through yet another Christmas season with its parish demands?  And, most importantly, can her human suitor ever compete with the temptation of a riveting search dragon for her heart?

In 1982, Ridley Scott directed Blade Runner, his vision of a futuristic, dystopian, neo-noir science fiction film which was loosely adapted from the Philip K. Dick novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Neon store-front lights reflect in the rain slicked Los Angeles of 2019 as brightly lit dirigibles rumbled across the dark sky, flashing elaborate advertisements overhead. All manners of life – human and replicant – commingle, trying to find meaning and memorable moments that culminate into a comforting identity. Drawing on themes of religion, technology, implications of genetic engineering, and an examination of humanity, Blade Runner has captivated decades of audiences with not one but seven versions of the 1982 film.  In honor of the original (or the six other versions) and the highly anticipated Blade Runner 2049 releasing today, Fanbase Press is running a special editorial series to examine the original film and its lasting influence in popular culture.

In 1982, Ridley Scott directed Blade Runner, his vision of a futuristic, dystopian, neo-noir science fiction film which was loosely adapted from the Philip K. Dick novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Neon store-front lights reflect in the rain slicked Los Angeles of 2019 as brightly lit dirigibles rumbled across the dark sky, flashing elaborate advertisements overhead. All manners of life – human and replicant – commingle, trying to find meaning and memorable moments that culminate into a comforting identity. Drawing on themes of religion, technology, implications of genetic engineering, and an examination of humanity, Blade Runner has captivated decades of audiences with not one but seven versions of the 1982 film.  In honor of the original (or the six other versions) and the highly anticipated Blade Runner 2049 releasing today, Fanbase Press is running a special editorial series to examine the original film and its lasting influence in popular culture.

When characters die in a story, it’s not always clear what the resulting impact will be from the person’s absence. In Lifeformed: Cleo Makes Contact, it’s made clear that the main character will be dealing with an alien invasion “and her father’s death.” Dark Horse Books tells you up front in the synopsis, but it’s not enough. It still doesn’t prepare the reader for the shock that comes within those pages, and that translates to the story being told by writer Matt Mair Lowery and artist Cassie Anderson.

Quality Time with Family Ties is a weekly podcast in which three guys watch and review Family Ties - the '80s sitcom that made Michael J. Fox a star.

"Dream Date." Today on QTWFT, we learn . . . (Space for a joke. Here.)

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