Planetoid 3This issue is all about developing the world. As the group of misfits (the tribes, Frog Men, scavengers, and Silas, an aging space pirate who just wants to find a way off the planet) start to work together and form a community on this desolate planetoid, we're treated to a montage of their accomplishments over the course of several months as they go from a set of groups at one another's throats to a real settlement. This may not sound like much for an issue, but these events really show what the characters are capable of and Silas starts to grow as he takes his focus from trying to find a way off the planetoid to finding a way to help these people. At the heart of this issue is the lesson that independently we have our skills, but we can create so much more when we work with others and have our skills complement one another.

 

Prophet V1 RemissionImage Comics' relaunch of the Prophet series is one of those rare comics that defies easy explanation.  While main character John Prophet has seemingly superhuman powers, it’s not a superhero story.  While he is on a mission, it’s not strictly a quest story.   And, while there are talking aliens and animals, it’s definitely not about cute and cuddly.

 

Ben 10 OmniverseOver the past several years, Ben Tennyson has been the hero that everyone needed, yet no one thought of.  He has saved the Earth—and the rest of the galaxy (and perhaps the universe, too)—from threats so huge that they sometimes induce cultist activities.  And, while he may have annoying tendencies toward self-imposed fame, he always tries to do the right thing, along with the help of his cousin, Gwen, and one-time-enemy, Kevin.  Now, as they move forward in their lives, he’s back to his old tricks—protecting the Earth, one alien at a time.

SPOILER WARNING!

 

Torn in TwoWithin the first page of the book, I was immediately captivated by author Brit Sigh's use of the English language to describe a scene. In Torn in Two, he has crafted a psychological thriller full of twists and turns.

SPOILERS BELOW

 

Satanic Hell 2Satanic Hell #2 continues the story of a death metal band cutting their way through their own personal Hell: an uber-exaggerated, super right-wing and ultra-religious Texas! While writer Grigoris Douros has some really interesting and creative elements in his story, certain elements of the premise doesn’t stand up to much scrutiny. Satanic Hell operates best when it’s viewed as the sequential art equivalent of an inspired, yet rough, cut of a B-movie - just hold on for the ride and don’t ask too many questions.
 

SPOILERS BELOW

Sean HemeonAt the premiere of Husbands Season 2 at the Paley Center for Media, Fanboy Comics President Bryant Dillon talks with co-star Sean Hemeon about the likelihood of Husbands jumping to a network, the amount of improv in each show, and the role that the show plays in moving the issue of equality forward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff GreensteinAt the premiere of Husbands Season 2 at the Paley Center for Media, Fanboy Comics President Bryant Dillon talks with director Jeff Greenstein about what he looks for in a comedy, why he's amped about Season 2, and why you should be, too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Espenson 2At the premiere of Husbands Season 2 at the Paley Center for Media, Fanboy Comics President Bryant Dillon talks with the series' Executive Producer/writer Jane Espenson about Season 2, the impressive list of guest stars, and how the series hopes to break traditional media barriers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brad Cheeks BellAt the premiere of Husbands Season 2 at the Paley Center for Media, Fanboy Comics President Bryant Dillon talks with the series' Executive Producer/writer/co-star Brad "Cheeks" Bell about the fan support that made the second season possible and how this show intends to break through traditional media barriers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air Vol. 1Vertigo’s Air (Wilson & Perker) is a solid attempt to mesh fantasy into a post 9/11 world, and while such a venture is to be applauded, it does so with mixed results.  The narrative is at times jarring and disjointed, harkening back to the weaker episodes of Lost,  except there are no sound or music cues and very few visual clues to let you know where you are in the sequence of events.  It’s an interesting choice, which gives the audience the benefit of the doubt, but it can at times be confusing. 


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