"What do you know about this mendacity thing? Hell! I could write a book on it! I could write a book on it and still not cover the subject. Think of all the lies I got to put up with!–Pretenses! Ain’t that mendacity? Having to pretend stuff you don’t think or feel or have any idea of?"  This line from Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, artfully encapsulates the quagmire with which we find ourselves in relationships, as a society, and - horrifyingly - within the political climate of our country: forced to survive within an unending battle of truth and lies, all for varying purposes, leaving us struggling to clarify fact from illusion - either finding our place within the world or succumbing to the madness it provokes.  It is this exhausting battle for honesty that influences the characters of The Antaeus Theatre Company's production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, which recently inaugurated the company's new home at the Kiki & David Gindler Performing Arts Center in Glendale, CA.  In a powerful production that expertly examines the depths to which humans will augment, reshape, and blatantly disregard the truth to maintain their place in the world, avoid their fate, or willfully remain ignorant of its costs, Antaeus' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof deftly tackles one of Williams' most incredible masterpieces at a significant time in our history, when mendacity knows no bounds and threatens to be our undoing.

“It’s Only a Paper Moon”
7.10 (aired December 30, 1998)

“All I can tell you is that you’ve got to play the cards life deals you. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, but at least you’re in the game.”
    -- Vic Fontaine

Hey there, Wonder Maniacs! Here we are again for another exciting edition of Wonder Woman Wednesday. This week, we have the opportunity to share an interview with a very unique Wonder Woman Cosplayer: Wonder WoBear. What do you get when you mix Wonder Woman with a burly, hairy, gay man? WONDER WOBEAR!

I’ve always been fascinated by the henchpeople employed by supervillains in superhero stories. They’re usually just background, incidental to the action: an obstacle for the hero to overcome before moving on to bigger game. But what drives someone to go into that line of work? What are their lives like outside of their jobs? Does it pay well? Henchgirl attempts to answer some of these questions and weaves a thoroughly entertaining story in the process.

I reviewed the first issue of this comic in July of last year. Then, due to various circumstances, I never had a chance to continue the story. I very much wanted to, though, which is why I was excited for the chance to review this first volume, collecting the first six issues of the comic together. Though it wasn’t perfect, I saw a lot of potential in the first issue, and I’m happy to report that subsequent issues have lived up to that potential admirably.

Orphan Black: Deviations #1 shows us what would happen if Sarah had saved Beth from committing suicide on the train platform. Despite this major twist in plot, this issue still really feels like the TV show. Heli Kennedy keeps much of the familiar plot in tact. The key players are introduced, and they reference several complications likely to fully develop in upcoming issues. This issue is jam-packed with exciting moments. It brings me back to the early episodes of season 1 of the show. My main question is: How will Beth alter things to come? I can’t imagine that the story proceeds exactly as it did on the show with Beth added into the mix. She is an original member of Clone Club who has lots of resources. She should definitely impact some of the drama yet to unfold. And I also look forward to how Kennedy will imagine the dynamic between Beth and Helena.

Dan Abnett has been writing since the '90s. He’s a good writer. His work on the video game, Alien: Isolation, is really quite good, but for some reason his Life and Death series has felt less than inspired. Even on a basic structural level, it’s been pretty clumsy. The dramatic thrust sort of moves haltingly forward. There’s nothing surprising that occurs and every interesting idea is undercut by characters that aren’t all that interesting.

On a warm sunny Sunday afternoon, March 26, 2017, fans flocked to the Dolby Theater in Los Angeles for a screening and panel discussion with the cast of ABC’s Scandal. The panel was part of the PaleyFest sponsored by Hulu (streaming the panels), Official Card Citi, and The Los Angeles Times. For those who may not be familiar with this TV program, the show revolves around a fixer, who is the "go-to" person to resolve delicate and sensitive political situations that require crisis management. Set in Washington, D.C., there are naturally several story tendrils involving White House staff – all the way to the President. As the name implies, there is plenty of scandal in the nation’s capital and fans love it.

Dark Horse gives its fans - and anyone interested in taking a glimpse into successful runs in the comic book world - a collection of first issues that will capture your attention. In today’s comic book world, there are an endless number of titles listed online in locations like ComiXology, or in your local comic book shop. When you stop by to take a look, the experience might be overwhelming if you’re uncertain of what you’re looking for. Now, in enters Dark Horse Number Ones 2017 – a collection of eight comic books from different series.

In The Fanbase Weekly, the Fanbase Press staff and a host of special guests from across the pop culture spectrum discuss the top geek stories of the week.

In this episode, the Fanbase Press staff welcomes guests Wil Panganiban (Cartoonist, Frank & Steinwayand Janet Joyce Holden (The Origins of Blood series) to discuss the latest geek news stories of the week, including the details of the new Han Solo feature film, whether Sony will tie in the Venom film with the MCU, the similarities between Life and Alien, and remembering Bernie Wrightson.

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